Llist discussion - AIAI  and LAULAU

aiai, laulau (N.I.): trees that bears small, red edible fruits (Syzygium jambos [rose apple], S. malaccense [Malay apple], and probably Eugenia spp.) (May, 1984: 76-77; Verheij and Coronel, 1991: 292-294). The trees are also used for medicine, magic, axes, digging sticks, construction, and cooking (Powell, 1976: 138, 143-145, 149, 153, 164-169).

Tom Slone 4 Oct 2001
tom@potency.berkeley.edu
THSlone@usa.net


Some comments on Thomas' list:

aiai, laulau (N.I.): trees that bears small, red edible fruits (Syzygium jambos [rose apple], S. malaccense [Malay apple], and probably Eugenia spp.) (May, 1984: 76-77; Verheij and Coronel, 1991: 292-294).

This is Eugenia and it is probably an exotic, introduced early in the 19th century. It has no local name in many places.

Bryant Allen 4 Oct 2001


Syzygium malaccense and S. aqueum are both called laulau in Manus tok pisin, where both are abundant. So are other similar things, more acridly turpentine-tasting but enjoyed by children.  All these have tok ples names as well, as they do also in New Ireland, according to Peekel. If they are introductions, I'd bet on a much earlier date than 19th century in the Bismarcks.
Peekel says the Lamekot names for S. malaccense are lolau and laulau.

Jean Kennedy, 9 Nov 2001